Problem Solving

Another important aspect of the assessment is problem solving.

You’ll see Iris again in the next clip. She is trying to fit puzzle shapes into a form board. At first, she works by trial and error. Mother then gives her some support, by indicating that she should rotate the shapes. Iris gets the idea, and finishes the job without further difficulty.

- Click on a picture to play video clip -

As you have seen, the entire assessment procedure is embedded within a natural context. In Iris’ case, the best person to carry out the assessment was her mother. This was also true for Landon and Matthew. This approach gives a child the opportunity to perform at his/her best.

Additional domains assessed in this approach are:

  • Biobehavioural state of the child
  • Orienting responses
  • Learning channels
  • Approach-withdrawal
  • Memory
  • Habituation
  • Anticipation and routine learning

Study our CD to see how all of the domains are assessed. It is available from American Printing House for the Blind, Inc., in Louisville, Kentucky: Manual: Child-guided Strategies: The van Dijk Approach to Assessment. (Go to Chapter 5.1 for additional information.)

You can also obtain the manual from this website: Manual: Child-guided Strategies: The van Dijk Approach to Assessment.

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